Events

Spring 2017

Welcome to a new semester at CMES! Please find below the spring 2017 program. Please note that the program is still preliminary and subject to change.

To make sure to never miss out of any of our events (or changes to the program) you can subscribe to our program in any calendar supporting the iCal format. Simply do so by copying the following adress and paste it into your calendar using the option subscribe to calendar: bit.ly/1pytLsC

Date Title Location Time
Jan. 19 CMES on Tour: Vad är islamism? Bakgrund, yttringar och tendenser (SWE)

En föreläsning som reder ut begreppen kring den så mångskiftande företeelsen islamism. Vad är den historiska och sociala bakgrunden? Vad förenar och vad skiljer olika yttringar av islamism, från de mest civila till de mest våldsbejakande
Trelleborgs stadsbibliotek 12:00
Feb. 08 Yazidis: Survivors of 74 Genocides

Nareen Shammo is an Iraqi journalist and activist who belongs to the Yazidi community. Nareen resigned from her position as an investigative journalist when ISIS started attacking the Yazidi community and enslaving its women and children while killing all the men. She thus decided to devote herself to the rescue and protection of Yazidi women, creating networks that will help captured women to escape or that will collect funds to be used to buy these women’s freedom. Come listen to Nareen talk about the Yazidi women's situation and their struggle to regain freedom.

CMES seminar room 16:00
March 2 Female citizens at the crossroads after 2011: Reproducing noncitizens and stateless in Kuwait and beyond

Rania Maktabi, Associate professor
Østfold University College

A decade has passed since female citizens in Kuwait were enfranchised in 2005. Political rights for women, and the mobilization of stateless Bidun in Kuwait after the 2011 Arab Uprisings, are two factors that impact on the politicization of pressures to reform the patriarchal nationality law in Kuwait formed in 1959. Similar pressures for reform, as well as counter-pressures against change in the status quo, are found in other member states of the Gulf Cooperation Council, and most Levantine states in MENA, such as Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan.
In the lecture, Dr. Maktabi presents how Kuwaiti women, female activists and lawyers, as well as Members of parliament –particularly those with tribal background– have engaged in raising claims for addressing the problems of Kuwaiti women married to noncitizens. The presentation outlines some of the political responses towards demands for expanding the Kuwaiti citizenry by fellow citizens, opponent groups, and Kuwaiti authorities.
CMES seminar room 16:00
March 8 Courtship and Marriage among Arab Youth in Urban Jordan

Sandra Nasser el-Dine, PhD candidate in Social Anthropology
University of Tampere, Finland


Based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in the Jordanian capital Amman, the lecture discusses young women’s and men’s experiences of intimate relationships. The focus is in the current ambiguities and negotiations of courtship practices, which will be addressed especially from the point of view of affective elements in relationship dynamics.
CMES seminar room 16:00
March 20 "Islam as Love in Post-Revolutionary Cairo"

Mark Sedgwick, Professor, School of Culture and Society - Arabic and Islam Studies, Aarhus University

Contemporary Cairo is a city where multiple subjectivities coexist, some modern and others postmodern, some distinctly Egyptian and others reflecting globalization and hybridity. This talk investigates the postmodern, globalized and hybrid subjectivity that sees Islam as love, drawing on a phenomenally successful novel, The Forty Rules of Love: A Tale of Jalal al-Din Rumi, by the Turkish author Elif Shafak. Although Shafak self-identifies as Turkish, she was born in France and lives mostly in London, and wrote The Forty Rules of Love in English, drawing on Western sources as well as on the classic Persian story of Shams and Rumi. The Forty Rules of Love is thus a quintessentially hybrid work, and its impact in the Arab world is a product of globalization. Its Arab reception, however, also reflects local conditions: the preference of Muslims for spirituality expressed within the Islamic tradition, and also contemporary Arab politics, which make inclusive and anti-sectarian messages especially welcome in some circles. Hybridity and glocalization—the process whereby the global also acquires distinctively local meanings—are thus two of the major themes of this talk.
CMES seminar room 16:00
March 21 CMES on Tour: Flykting och elitstudent. Berättelser om utanförskap och framtidshopp (SWE)

Torsten Janson, forskare Centrum för Mellanösternstudier

I snart 70 har Libanons palestinska flyktingar levt som statslösa, med stora inskränkningar i rätt till egendom och arbete. Ofta lever de under eländiga villkor i överbefolkade flyktingläger. Barn och ungdom är särskilt utsatta, inte minst vad gäller brister i utbildning. Samtidigt finns strimmor av hopp. Under senare år har Torsten Janson följt en grupp ungdomar som fått tillfälle att läsa vid Libanons toppuniversitet. Föreläsningen ger en inblick i hur dessa ungdomar tänker kring liv och uppväxt som unga palestinier. Vad har de för bild av sin skolgång och vad innebär den plötsliga flytten från flyktingläger till elituniversitet?
Landskrona stadsbibliotek 13:00
March 22 The integration and acculturation of second-generation Turks in Sweden from an international diasporic perspective

Memet Aktürk Drake, Centre for Linguistics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel


Adult second-generation (G2) Turks born and raised in different parts of Western Europe, North America and Australia provide us with an interesting case for comparing the effects of the integration and minority policies of these different diasporic contexts. Firstly, their parents, who immigrated in the 1960s and 1970s, were subject to highly divergent integration policies couched in different state ideologies towards minorities. Secondly, the G2 itself experienced acculturation against varying historical, economic and political backgrounds. Previous studies have found marked differences between the Turkish diaspora in Western Europe and the New World with stronger preservation of the Turkish heritage in the former and stronger identification with the majority society in the latter (Yağmur 2016). Sweden constitutes a special case because it deviates from the rest of Europe as the country with the earliest policies that actually aimed at integrating the immigrant parents and as the most enduring representative of multiculturalism in Europe (Borevi 2012, MPI 2017). In this talk, I will first outline Sweden’s particular brand of “welfare multiculturalism”. Based on data from the large-scale European project The Integration of The European Second Generation (TIES), I will go on to discuss the integration and acculturation profiles of G2 Turks in Stockholm (cf. Crul et al. 2012, Westin 2015). The main focus will be the impact of multicultural discourses and policies on identity formation, with special consideration for issues related to bilingualism such as language proficiency and use. I will also present comparisons with other Western European cities within the same project, especially Paris. The main conclusion is that the integration and acculturation profiles of G2 Turks in Sweden constitute to some extent an intermediate case between the general patterns observed in Western Europe and the New World (Aktürk-Drake forthcoming).
CMES seminar room 16:00
March 22 Jubileumskurs: Handslag, famntag, klapp eller kyss? Hur vi hälsar och gränserna för mångfalden (SWE)

Dan-Erik Andersson, forskare Centrum för Mellanösternstudier.

Alla samhällen bygger på kompromisser kring traditioner och värderingar. Men var går gränsen för samförstånd: Hur ska vi hälsa på varandra? Ska vi ha skolavslutning I kyrkan? Separata badtider? Ett föredrag baserat på det senaste årets debatter med Dan-Erik Andersson, universitetslektor i Mänskliga rättigheter vid Lunds universitet. Dan-Erik Andersson undervisar främst om mänskliga rättigheter i förhållande till etik och religion. Läs mer om hans forskning och undervisning här.
LUX AULA 19:00
March 23 CMES on Tour: Kan klimatförändringar och vattenbrist orsaka konflikter?
(SWE)

Lina Eklund, forskare Centrum för Mellanösternstudier
Staffanstorps bibliotek 17:30
March 30 - 31 Progress, Prospects and New Directions: Re-connecting and Re-energizing

CMES Alumni conference 2017 Present and former students of the MA programme in Middle Eastern Studies at CMES are invited to an Alumni conference last week of March 2017. More information will follow but please let us now if you´re interested in joining. Send an email to our education coordinator Tina: kristina.robertsson@cme.lu.se Read more here: bit.ly/20E0fx4
AF-borgen See program
April 4 CMES 10th Jubilee week: Ellen Lust - The State of the State in the Middle East: Status and Implications

The state has increasingly come under threat in the Middle East, with civil wars, porous borders, and rising ideologies challenging their legitimacy. This talk will provide an overview of these challenges, and focus on the meaning for both domestic and international actors.

Ellen Lust is Professor, Dept. of Political Science, University of Gothenburg
Founding Director, Program on Governance and Local Development at Yale University
Founding Director, Program on Governance and Local Development at the University of Gothenburg
Non-Resident Senior Fellow, Project on Middle East Democracy, Washington, DC
CMES seminar room 16:00
April 5 CMES 10th Jubilee week: Michelle Obeid - Disrupted Borders, Security and the Trapped Subject: the Lebanese/Syrian border

In this public address, Michelle Obeid will talk about the areas by the Lebanese/Syrian border and the repercussions of the conflict and the emergence of Da`ish. The talk will draw on her long-term fieldwork and knowledge of the border. How do the people who are not drawn into radical Islamism experience the changes and securitization? And what are the experiences of the communities that are ‘hosting’ refugees – an area of research so far underexplored.
CMES seminar room 16:00
April 6 CMES 10th Jubilee week: Ido Zelkovitz - From the Books to the Guns: Students and the Palestinian Revolution in Historical Perspective

The lecture will explore the Palestinian Student Movement from an historical and sociological perspective; the main aim of the presentation is to demonstrate how Palestinian national identity has been built in the absence of national institutions, whilst emphasizing the role of higher education as an agent of social change, capable of crystallizing patterns of national identity.
CMES seminar room 16:00
April 7 CMES 10th Jubilee week: Dr. Abbas Milani - From Sayyad Qutb to Seyyed Khamenei: Islamist Challenge of modernity

For the last century, modernity has been the most enduring challenge facing Muslim societies of the Middle East. What does Sayyad Qutb, the grand theorist of the Muslim Brotherhood in predominantly Sunni Egypt, share with Sayyad Khamenei, the Supreme Leader of the predominantly Shiite Iran, in their challenge to Modernity?
CMES seminar room 16:00
April 25 FEMALE LEADERSHIP IN WORSHIP: Female imams and the institutionalisation of Islamic feminism- The making of The Mariam Mosque

The Center for Middle Eastern Studies and the Association for Foreign Affairs organizes a talk with Sherin Khankan, Denmark's first female imam who has led the foundation of a women-only mosque in Copenhagen called Mariam Mosque. She is also an activist on Muslim issues including female integration and extremism, and has written numerous texts discussing Islam and politics.

In the beginning of 2015 the organization, FEMIMAM, was launched to advocate for the inclusion of women functioning as imamahs in Denmark. In 2016, FEMIMAM launched Scandinavia’s first mosque with female imamahs performing Islamic ceremonies, offering Islamic spiritual care and facilitating seminars and religious ceremonies: Islamic marriage, conversions and divorce. FEMIMAM works to challenge patriarchal structures in the leadership of religious worship and education, and to challenge men’s monopoly on the interpretation of the Quran.
In Denmark the first female priests were ordained in April 1948 within the Protestant church. Today the number of female and male priests is about the same and women have a higher representation than men at The Faculties of Theology at Danish universities. In Denmark minority groups of Jewish and Muslim scholars, both men and women, push for the same development calling for Scandinavian full-time female rabbis and imamahs.
Café Athen 18:15
April 27 CMES on Tour: Flykting och elitstudent. Berättelser om utanförskap och framtidshopp (SWE)

Torsten Janson, forskare Centrum för Mellanösternstudier

I snart 70 har Libanons palestinska flyktingar levt som statslösa, med stora inskränkningar i rätt till egendom och arbete. Ofta lever de under eländiga villkor i överbefolkade flyktingläger. Barn och ungdom är särskilt utsatta, inte minst vad gäller brister i utbildning. Samtidigt finns strimmor av hopp. Under senare år har Torsten Janson följt en grupp ungdomar som fått tillfälle att läsa vid Libanons toppuniversitet. Föreläsningen ger en inblick i hur dessa ungdomar tänker kring liv och uppväxt som unga palestinier. Vad har de för bild av sin skolgång och vad innebär den plötsliga flytten från flyktingläger till elituniversitet?
Båstad stadsbibliotek 13:00
April 27 The digital society: Weapons of Mass Participation: Social Media, radicalization, and the Politics of Crowdfunding for War in Iraq and Syria

Public lecture with Nicole Grove, University of Hawaii. Numerous North American and European civilians have traveled to engage in combat operations against the Islamic State (ISIS) in the globalized and decentralized battlefields of Iraq and Syria. Nicole argues that these individuals represent a different kind of fighter from both private military contractors and battlefield laborers profiled in the private security literature. The second part of the talk focuses on how the imagined communities who support these fighters, both morally and financially, through the networks of Facebook and peer-to-peer funding platforms like GoFundMe, suggest a radical deviation from conventional organizational structures and capacities for waging combat.
This event is organised by Lund University Internet Institute (LUii) and Center for Middle Eastern Studies (CMES). It is open to everyone, and no pre-registration is required.
LUX aula övre 15:15
May 9 CMES on Tour: Kan klimatförändringar och vattenbrist orsaka konflikter?
(SWE)

Lina Eklund, forskare Centrum för Mellanösternstudier
Svalövs bibliotek 18:00
May 10 A Conversation About:
Music, Religion and the Black Atlantic

Organized by Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the Centre for Religious Studies and Theology at Lund University & Oscar Signe Krook's Foundation. After the conversation drinks and snacks will be served. The Moroccan rapper el Haqed and Reda Zine (guitar and guimbri) will perform exclusive acoustic set.

The talk discusses the rise of both highly politicized music of the Black Atlantic tradition, from Reggae and Bob Marley to Afrobeat and Fela Kuti, as well as hip-hop in the US and Americas more broadly and how these often irreverent and always "weaponized" genres went up against the rise of highly conservative forms of Islam and Christianity that emerged in the 1960s and 1970s across West and North Africa, from Saudi-inspired Islamism to American-funded evangelical trends among Christians. Finally, Aidi and LeVine look at the intersection of religion and pop culture in the neoliberal global era through music in contemporary African and African American music, exploring the continuities and challenges of producing, consuming and politicizing popular culture today on both sides of the Atlantic.

Participants:
Hisham Aidi is a lecture at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. He is also a fellow at Columbia’s Center for Contemporary Black History, where he edits the journal Souls. He has also worked as a journalist, contributing to various magazines (ColorLines, The New African, Middle East Report. He was born in Tangier, Morocco to an Arabic and Berber-speaking family. His latest book Rebel Music – Race, Empire, and the New Muslim Youth Culture (2014) won the American Book Award in 2015.

Mark LeVine is a professor of Middle Eastern History at University of California, Irvine, and a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Center For Middle Eastern Studies at Lund University. LeVine is also an accomplished rock guitarist and has played with noted rock and world beat musicians such as for example Mick Jagger, Chuck D, Michael Franti, and Doctor John. LeVine has written and edited several books for example: Heavy metal Muslims: the rise of a post-Islamist public sphere (2009) and Islam and Popular Culture (2016)

Tia Korpe (Moderator) has spent the last decade working in the music, social change, and cultural industry and is a DJ and Hip Hop activist. Korpe has consulted for a number of festivals, UNESCO Youth, International Music Council, Freemuse, Danish Center for Culture & Development. Since 2010 Korpe has worked across the Middle East and North Africa as the Program Officer for the MENA Region at the Danish non-profit organization Turning Tables (http://turningtables.org/). Korpe is also the co-founder of Jordan’s first Urban Arts festival 'The Word Is Yours' and an external lecturer at Copenhagen University MA elective Global Urban Studies.
LUX C:121 18:00
May 11 The annual Ingmar Karlsson Lecture - Jenny White - Big Man to Chief: The Consolidation of Power in Turkey


The Center for Middle Eastern Studies proudly presents this year's "Annual Ingmar Karlsson Lecture" speaker Jenny White, Professor of Turkish Studies at SUITS.

Political and economic life in Turkey has long relied on highly personalized networks that redistribute power and resources and allow some parts of the population to rise at the expense of others. Is that era now coming to an end with the rise of a strong, institutional chiefdom?

Political and economic life in Turkey has long relied on highly personalized networks that redistribute power and resources and allow some parts of the population to rise at the expense of others. Is that era now coming to an end with the rise of a strong, institutional chiefdom?

Jenny White, professor Turkish Studies, Stockholm University
LUX C:121 19:00
May 15 Lund University Sustainabilty week - Poster exhibition Sustainability in the Middle East

“Sustainability in the Middle East”
Sustainable use of water and agriculture is fundamental for the future well-being of the Middle East region. This poster exhibition, prepared by master students at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, shows a series of examples of sustainability challenges and practices in the Middle East.

“Post-conflict futures”
It is essential to include a sustainability perspective in humanitarian aid during an ongoing conflict and also during the reconstruction phase. By taking into account environmental aspects and how various issues such as energy and water supply are related to distribution issues, new conflicts and crises can be avoided.
The presentation is organised by Post-conflict futures, a project initiated by the IIIEE and the Centre for Middle Eastern Studies, bringing together a group of Syrian academics in Sweden to reflect on possible developments and the choices they entail.

Stadshallen Lund 15:00 - 21:00
May 15 Lund University Sustainabilty week - Jordan River Basin Boardgame

During two hours we will play a boardgame and a role-play with interested participants of the public to bring the subject of sustainable river management in the Jordan River Basin context to a wider audience. Arranged by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University.
Stadshallen Lund 15:00 - 17:00
May 16 Lund University Sustainabilty week - Post-conflict futures for sustainability in the Middle East

The lecture discusses the complex issues of social and environmental sustainability and their interrelationships in post-conflict contexts. Arranged by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University. No pre-registration is required.
CMES seminar room 15:00
May 17 Lund University Sustainabilty week - Film: Water, War and Syria

Welcome to KINO to see two documentary films connected to water, war and Syria by the filmmaker and anthropologist Joshka Wessels at Lund University. There will also be a preview of her new film.

Little Waterfall (52 mins.)
Between 1999 and 2004 Joshka Wessels conducted long-term fieldwork in a Syrian village called “Little Waterfall” located at the edge of the Syrian desert in Aleppo province. She documented the rehabilitation of an ancient 2000-year old water tunnel system called Qanat Romani, still in use for irrigation and one of the most sustainable techniques to bring water to the desert.
Nationality Unknown (40 mins.)
A film made between 2011–2014 as part of the project “Hydropolitics in the Jordan Riverbasin”. The Syrian citizens of Majdal Shams and four other villages have been under Israeli occupation since the October war in 1973. Are there any prospects of peace in this area that is inflicted by a protracted military occupation?
Preview of the new film: "The Syrian war and memories of Little Waterfall"
In 2014, Joshka Wessels learned that the village of Little Waterfall is no more. The houses are empty, looted and deserted during the Syrian war. The new film (work in progress) reflects on the memory of Little Waterfall by intersecting contemporary footage of interviews with its former inhabitants who are now Syrian refugees in Germany and the Netherlands.
KINO, Kyrkogatan 3 17:00 - 19:00
May 19 Lund University Sustainabilty week - Narratives of Hope: Scenarios for Syria 2040

A public statement from the post-conflict futures scenario group. Arranged by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Lund University.
No pre-registration is required.
CMES seminar room 13:00

Spring Program 2017