lunduniversity.lu.se

Spring Programme 2019

FEB 6
12:00 - 13:00

Room 129, Eden Building
Paradisgatan 5H

 

Nazanin Shahrokni: Women in Place: The State and the Politics of Gender Segregation in Iran


Nazanin Shahrokni, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Syracuse University and Visiting Researcher at the Center for Middle East Studies at Lund University.

Women in Place offers a gripping inquiry into gender segregation policies and women’s rights in contemporary Iran. Shahrokni’s theoretically rich ethnography takes us on a ride in gender-segregated buses, inside a women-only park, and outside the closed doors of sports stadiums, where women are banned from attending men’s soccer matches. Through a retelling of the past four decades of state policy regulating the gender boundary, Women in Place challenges notions of the Iranian state as overly unitary, ideological, and isolated from social forces, and pushes us to contemplate the changing place of women in a social order shaped by capitalism, state-sanctioned Islamism, and global debates about women’s rights.

Facebook event: www.facebook.com/events/775549759465265/

FEB 20
12:00 - 13:00

CMES
Finngatan 16

 

Sinem Kavak: Water Struggles in Contemporary Turkey: Politics, Capital and Plural Agencies


Sinem Kavak is a political scientist specialising in Turkish politics and comparative political economy, and a Visiting Researcher at CMES.

Legitimized by the climate change mitigation discourse, run-on-river small hydropower plants (SHPs) have proliferated in rural Turkey during the AKP era. The electricity market was liberalized through a series of reforms, with use-rights of the rivers leased to private companies for a period of 49 years. This led to large-scale commercialization of nature and dispossession for the local communities, and an unprecedented wave of mobilization in the countryside. By focusing on water struggles, the research digs into the questions of crony capitalism, erosion of separation of powers, and the transformation contentious politics together with uneven forms of agency and resistance strategies in authoritarian Turkey.

Facebook event: www.facebook.com/events/2195704617335596/

FEB 27
19:00 - 20:30

Palaestra et Odeum
Paradisgatan 4

 

Panel Discussion: The Future of Non-State Actors in Syria


This event is co-hosted with UPF Lund

With Donald Trump’s announcement of a US withdrawal from Syria, following the apparent defeat of Islamic State (ISIS), the political scene in the conflict-ridden country continues to shift. Numerous non-state actors continue to proliferate, ranging from Islamist groups like Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham (HTS) and al-Qaeda affiliate Huras al-Din, to Iranian and regime-aligned militias. Two areas are to witness significant developments that would influence the trajectory of the geopolitical conflict: Idlib, as the last major province under opposition control in which HTS has consolidated its power in recent months; And Rojava in north east Syria, where Kurdish militias have to choose between Turkey and its affiliated national liberation fronts (Ziniki, Ahrar al-Sham) and others, or the Syrian regime supported by Iranian militias.

How have these actors situated themselves within the new political scene? what are the implications of the American withdrawal from north west Syria on these actors? What is the future of the Islamist and jihadist groups in Idlib? How do the non-state actors fit into the interests of states like Turkey, Russia, Iran, and indeed Assad’s regime?

Chair: Rola El-Husseini, Director of Studies and Associate Professor, CMES

Speakers:
Aymenn Jawad al-Tamimi - Aymenn is a freelance journalist and specialist on the Syrian Civil War, Iraqi Civil War and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. His work focuses on militant groups of all affiliations in Iraq and Syria, with particular interest in those of jihadist orientation. He is regularly quoted in media including Al Jazeera, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, The Washington Post, and other publications.

Salam Kawakibi – Salam is a Political science and international relations researcher. He is Director at the Paris office of the Arab Centre for Research and Policy Studies and Professor in the Masters’ Programme on Development, Immigration and Crises, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Previously he was Deputy Director and Research Director in Arab Reform Initiative – ARI, France (2007 – 2017). Salam is also the co-founder and chairman of The Day After: Supporting a Democratic Transition in Syria organisation (www.tda-sy.org), co-founder and member of the advisory board of the Mediterranean Citizens’ Assembly Foundation (MCAF) (www.fundacionacm.org), member of the advisory committee of the UNU Institute on Globalisation, Culture and Mobility (UNU-GCM) (www.gcm.unu.edu), member of the board of the Institute for Arab World and Mediterranean Research and Studies in Paris, and a member of the scientific committee of Confluences, the Paris magazine focusing on the Mediterranean region. In 2009 – 2011, Salam was the senior researcher in the Department of Political Science in the University of Amsterdam. Before that, in 2000 – 2006, he served as the director of the Institut français du Proche-Orient in Aleppo.

Facebook event: www.facebook.com/events/766440700394685/

MAR 6
12:00 - 13:00

CMES
Finngatan 16

 

Filippo Dionigi: Hezbollah’s Public Discourse Before and After the Syrian Conflict


Dr Filippo Dionigi is lecturer of politics and international relations at the University of Bristol, his research focusses on international relations theory applied to Middle Eastern politics. He is interested in international norms diffusion and Islamist movements and currently works on a study of the Syrian refugee crisis in neighbouring countries. Previously, he has published Hezbollah, Islamist Politics, and International Society (Palgrave MacMillan, 2014) while his articles have been published in International Peacekeeping, Middle East Law and Governance, and the European Journal of International Relations among others.

This paper proposes a critical assessment of the mutations of contents and vocabulary in the speeches of Hassan Nasrallah between 2007 to 2015. The methodology is the analysis of the compared frequency of the most common meaningful words from about 100 speeches delivered by the Hezbollah’s Secretary General. The word-frequency data are compared between two main sets: speeches given before 2011 and those given after 2011. This allows assessing how Hezbollah has presented and re-presented its public image before and after its intervention in the Syrian conflict. Preliminary results show that during the involvement of Hezbollah in the Syrian conflict, Nasrallah’s speeches have reformulated the public identity of this movement by highlighting new regional strategic priorities and adopting a language which is increasingly marked by sectarian tones. These aspects mark a sharp change from previous historical records which instead prioritized the fight against Israel and the reference to domestic Lebanese politics.

Facebook event: www.facebook.com/events/527201677792352/

MAR 20
12:00 - 13:00

CMES
Finngatan 16

 

Özlem Celik: The Role of the State in Financialisation of Housing in Turkey


Özlem Celik is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow funded by the Swedish Institute (SI) at the Department of Human Geography in Lund University. She holds a PhD in Urban Studies and Planning from the University of Sheffield in England in 2013. She is currently working on how global processes of housing in the form of financialisation, experienced in cities of the Global South, manifest at the local level. Previously, she has published on urban political economy, right to housing movements, urban regeneration, and financialisation of housing in Istanbul and in Turkey on academic and non-academic outlets and platforms.

This seminar focuses on the role of the state in mediating the demand and supply side of financialisation of housing process in the Global South. This analysis challenges accounts that analyse financialisation of housing as an institutional process of changing legislation and development of new financial tools by seeing the role of the state not only to respond the demands or interests of developers and builders, but also to respond the needs developed by poor people’s resistance against becoming indebted in the case of Turkey.

Facebook event: www.facebook.com/events/377491443040107/

MAR 23
13:00 - 16:00

Biografen Kino Lund
Kyrkogatan 3

 

The Swedish Human Rights Film Festival: Capernaum and Q&A with Spyros Sofos


As part of the Swedish Human Rights Film Festival, CMES Researcher Spyros Sofos will take part in a 30 minute Q&A discussion following the screening of Capernaum. Capernaum is a drama that draws attention to the plight of children in Beirut’s slums and the situation people without ID cards find themselves in (121 min, doc).

For more information and to book tickets see: humanrightsfilmfestival.se/index.php/2017/02/14/capernaum/

APR 3
12:00 - 13:00

CMES
Finngatan 16

 

Defne Kadıoğlu: “Acting Like a State” – Conflict and Street Justice in the Context of Istanbul’s Gentrification


Defne Kadıoğlu received her PhD from Boğaziçi University in Istanbul from the Department of Political Science and International Relations. She was a Stiftung Mercator-Istanbul Policy Center research fellow where she conducted her research on Tophane and is a recipient of the 2017 Sakıp Sabancı International Research Award. She is currently a guest researcher at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Lund University. Her research is mainly focused on neoliberal urban governance urban inequality.

Istanbul’s landscape is rapidly transforming with millions of people being affected by state- and privately-led urban transformation projects. One of the places affected is Tophane. Located in Istanbul’s entertainment and tourism center Beyoğlu, the area is known for its relatively conservative lifestyle and the dominance of Islamic sects and has often been named as a stronghold of the ruling Justice and Development Party (JDP). Though there is no comprehensive urban transformation targeting the quarter’s residential spaces, Tophane has come under increasing gentrification pressure through surrounding projects and the valorization of adjacent neighborhoods. In this course a series of violent and non-violent conflicts between long-term residents and perceived newcomers or gentrifiers have made headlines, causing Tophane to advance to a symbol of the rising tension between so-called secular and non-secular segments of Turkish society. This research, rather than on the relationship between the different social groups living and using Tophane, however, focuses on the interaction between long-term residents and the discourses and practices of the JDP and debates how inhabitants assert their agency by capitalizing on the party’s ideological sources. It thereby explores the argument that despite the apparent strength of the current regime in Turkey, citizens in moments when they deem necessary, try to enforce their own perception of justice, sometimes against the interest of the regime.

Facebook event: www.facebook.com/events/315570165751012/

APR 24
12:00 - 13:00

CMES
Finngatan 16

 

Joshua Sabih: What state or society has Israel become? Religion, Politics, and Jewishness


Joshua Sabih is a scholar of Middle Eastern and North African Studies. Between 2012-2018 he was an associate professor of Hebrew, Jewish & Israeli Studies at the University of Copenhagen. Now he is a visiting lecturer of the History of the Middle East at Lund University and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Copenhagen. He is the editor of the Journal of Religious Studies Review, and the author of the forthcoming book: Israel, Zionism & the Palestinian Question Under the Gaze of Critique-Double

It seems that the real issue upon which the Israelis are going to deliver their votes, in the parliamentary election of April 2019, is to elect a government to deliver the final blow to the two-states solution: A state of Israel and a state of Palestine living side by side. The parties that have taken upon themselves the task to do that are right and extreme right parties.

The new consensus is that the likelihood of a Palestinian state is near impossible. These elections, unlike the previous ones, are a kind of referendum on Likud´s and religious Zionist’s political project: the process of which began in 1967 and continues with confiscation, settlement, and Judaisation of Palestinian lands.

This lecture addresses three interrelated issues: religion, politics and Jewishness in the post-liberal age of Israeli political and cultural life.

Facebook event: www.facebook.com/events/650115812093489

MAY 15
12:00 - 13:00

CMES
Finngatan 16

 

Deniz Arzuk: A Data Mapping and Visualisation Project: Children's Rights in Turkey


Deniz Arzuk is a visiting researcher and Raoul Wallenberg Institute fellow based at the Child Studies Unit at Linköping University. In 2015, she received her PhD degree from The Ataturk Institute for Modern Turkish History at Bogazici University, with her thesis “Cut the Kids in Half: New Urban Childhoods in Turkey Through the Lens of the Mainstream Media, 1977-1997” which discusses the social construction of childhood in Turkey in the 1980s and the 1990s.

This presentation will explore possible uses of data visualisation and data mapping, first as a methodological tool for scholars that can help us visualise and understand what we work with, and second as a communication strategy to disseminate scholarly knowledge by making it available and accessible. In this presentation, I will introduce a data map based on my ongoing research project about the exercise of children’s rights in Turkey to underline the challenges children’s rights face in societies which are increasingly politicised and polarised. The accompanying data map follows the implementation of The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) in Turkey and illustrates how a child rights discourse can become an instrument to consolidate power, control expectations, and legitimise an authoritarian regime both nationally and internationally.

Facebook event: www.facebook.com/events/352628985323980/

JUN 4
12:00 - 13:00

CMES
Finngatan 16

 

Mustafa Menshawy: ‘Becoming an EX’: Patterns and Dynamics of Exiting Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood after 2011


Dr. Mustafa Menshawy is an assistant professor at the Doha Institute for Graduate Studies. He previously worked at the London School of Economics and Political Science, London, and the University of Westminster, London, where he taught for six years. A winner of Lorenzo Natali Prize for 2007, Dr. Menshawy' experience varies including working for the European Commission and consultancy companies such as Albany Associates. Dr. Menshawy worked as a correspondent and a political analyst for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). He reported the ‘Arab Spring’ as it has unfolded in Egypt and Libya. His recent book is State, Memory, and Egypt's Victory in the 1973 War: Ruling by Discourse (New York: Palgrave, 2017). His articles were published in peer-reviewed journals such as Journal of Contemporary Religion and Middle East Studies. His current projects focus on discourse analysis of the ‘First Ladies of Oppression’ in the Middle East.

How and why members of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood have disengaged from it at a higher level and volume in 2011 and afterwards? How have those individuals constructed the meanings of their experience through the interaction of “micro” psychological and emotional factors, “meso” level organizational factors, and “macro” political developments linked to the specific case of the Brotherhood and Egypt during the Arab Spring? Dr. Mustafa Menshawy seeks to answer these questions informed by his a three-year fieldwork research across Egypt, Turkey, the UK and Qatar. Dr. Menshawy leads us to interesting and valuable factors by dissecting the texts of ex-members and frames identified in them as they evolve around the ‘wife factor’, ‘real/imagined kinships’, and ‘Islam without Islamism’ and the ‘mind/body’ binarism. Using frame analysis and Critical Discourse analysis as well as triangulation of sources of data such as autobiographies and interviews, media appearances and social media, the speaker claims that disengagement is both process and discourse. The texturing of exiting members, as consistent, coherent and resonant as it is found to be, still awaits discursive re-enforcements provided by re-interpretation of ‘original’ texts and high-level ‘contentious politics’ in order to turn what is articulated into what is operationalized.

Facebook event: www.facebook.com/events/1187564478084647/

JUN 12
12:00 - 13:00

CMES
Finngatan 16

 

Shayna Silverstein: The Impossible Dance: Rural Expressions and Regime Ideology in Syrian Dabke


Shayna Silverstein is an assistant professor in Performance Studies at Northwestern University. Her research examines the politics and aesthetics of sound and movement in the contemporary Middle East, focusing on the Syrian dance music known as dabke. Her recent and upcoming publications include a chapter in Remapping Sound Studies and an audiography, Syrian Bodies, Sonic Ruptures, for a special issue of In-Transition. Her current book project, entitled Syria Moves: Performance, Politics, and Belonging in Syrian Dance Music, analyzes body, performance, and culture in prewar and wartime Syria.

The popular dance music tradition known as dabke has been heralded as a local expression of popular resistance against the Syrian regime, purportedly performed at non-violent protests and inspiring artists making political satire. At the same time, dabke is also perceived as a symbol of autocratic power by some intellectuals, and as a style of folklorized dance that reproduces nationalistic ideologies by others. In this talk, I trace the history and politics of a performance practice that is at once celebrated and shunned in order to unpack the complexity of Syria's fraught cultural battlegrounds before and during the conflict. Though dabke is performatively associated with “the people” and “the collective” in (post)socialist imaginaries of class revolution and postcolonial imaginaries of the local, I argue that its contemporary iterations have paradoxically contributed to the present-day isolation and fragmentation of Syrian society.

Facebook event: www.facebook.com/events/456791458460318/