lunduniversity.lu.se

3rd December - 7th December

3rd December - 7th December

  1. On Tuesday (4th), a seminar with Dr. Zafar Adeel and Dr. Joshka Wessels entitled "What role can Traditional Water Management Technologies Play in a Sustainable Future for all?" will be held between 14:30 and 15:30 at the Water Resources Engineering Department, LTH (Seminar Room, 3rd Floor, V building). 

    Dryland dwellers face the significant challenge of managing their scarce water resources sustainably, exacerbated further by global drivers such as climate change, land degradation, biodiversity loss and changes in vegetation cover, as well as pressures from demographic, economic and political processes. Over the centuries, dryland communities have developed traditional methods of harvesting and managing water, which have ensured long-term sustainability of this resource. The presenters will review the state of the art in different approaches and techniques for traditional water management in drylands and how these can be used to cope with today’s challenges. The case studies from different parts of the world identify successes and lessons learned from communities that are continuing to use traditional water management techniques. These case studies outline how traditional approaches can be applied effectively to meet the future water needs of the world’s dryland communities.

    Both experts have a longstanding expertise on the role of traditional water management for sustainable development and have worked in various capacities together. Dr. Zafar Adeel and Dr. Joshka Wessels have worked together on traditional water management in the Middle East and North African (MENA) region, when Dr. Adeel was, among others, responsible for the programme on Traditional Water Management at the United Nations University (UNU). Dr. Wessels carried out her PhD fieldwork for her Participatory Action Research in Syria on the rehabilitation of ancient water tunnels systems dating back from the Roman times between 2000 and 2004, which was partly supported by a UNU research grant. They worked together on the edited volume entitled “What Makes traditional Technologies Tick? A Review of Traditional Approaches for Water Management in Drylands” published by the UNU in 2008.

    For more information see the Facebook event here.

  2. Wednesday (5th December) is the beginning of the "Photography and Film For Freedom and Democracy in Yemen" exhibition. This has been arranged by Ibn Rushd Södra with the photographer Abdulrahman Al Gabri, supported by the Swedish Institute. The exhibition will take place 5-12 December 2018 at Lund University, LUX Building (LUX Aula, C116). 

    On the 5th December there will be a welcome session with a roundtable discussion and a music performance:

    10:00 Welcome and introductory words about the project

    10:30 Roundtable discussion "The use of art in expression of democracy and freedom" with speakers:

    Joshka Wessels - Lund University
    Mohammed Almahfali - Lund University
    Abdelrahman Alghabiri - Yemeni Identity Organization
    Nabil Albidanin - Human rights activist
    Abduljabbar Alsuhili - Activist 

    12:00 Music performance (Oud) with Izmat Al Labad

    For more information see the Facebook event here.

  3. Also on Wednesday (5th) between 16:00 and 18:00 Dr Zafar Adeel will give a talk entitled "From Conflict to Water Security: Women as Agents of Change". Dr. Adeel serves as the Executive Director of the Pacific Water Research Centre, and as Professor of Professional Practice at the School of Resources and Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University. The talk will take place at Edens hörsal, Paradisgatan 5H.

    A number of conflicts in the Arab region have impacted women and girls, displacing them from their homes as refugees or internally-displaced persons (IDP), and exposing them to physical and sexual abuse as well as day-to-day challenges of securing water for their families. 2017 estimates put the total number of refugees originating from the Arab region at 13 million, and another 17 million are considered IDPs. A large fraction of these persons are women and girls; for example, three-quarters of Syrian Refugees are women. Recent research at the Pacific Water Research Centre, conducted in collaboration with United Nations organisations, has addressed approaches for improving water security in these conflict zones, relying on women as agents of change. This work has resulted in specific recommendations to Arab regional structures and organisations, United Nations and international organisations, governments in the Arab region, and community-based organisations. The focus of these recommendations is on providing opportunities to women for leadership in diplomacy and management, for access to financial resources, and for fostering an enabling policy and institutional landscape.

    For more information see the Facebook event here.

Last week at CMES (26th November - 30th November)

  1. On Monday (26th), 17:00 - 18:30 at LUCSUS (Biskopsgatan 5) Hållbart Universitet is organizing an event on the topic of climate change and resource scarcity induced conflicts and collaboration. Lina Eklund will be in conversation with Mo Hamza from the Division of Risk Management and Societal Safety. This panel discussion will explore climate change induced land use changes and resource scarcity, and examine the conventional wisdom that resource scarcity directly leads to conflict. Could climate change induced resource scarcity actually produce more collaboration instead? 

    For more information see the Facebook event here.

  2. This Wednesday (28th) at 12:00, Fanny Christou, PhD in Geography, University of Poitiers and American University of Beirut, Visiting Researcher CMES, Lund University, will give a talk "Plural mobilisation and plural diaspora: the role of Palestinians in Sweden".
    Nearly 25 years after the Oslo accords, the Palestinians are still in the quest for Statehood. The emigration of Palestinians from the Middle East is still increasing in volume and is directed towards more distant areas with Sweden being one of the sites where part of the Palestinian diaspora is located and becomes active today. With the ambition to transcend an approach centered on the Palestinian issues in the Middle-Eastern host territories, Fanny's research focuses on a micro-located analysis in Malmö, Sweden. It questions the contours of the Palestinian diasporic fluidity based on the spatial, identity and political fissures that are emerging. The purpose here is to understand the meaning of “being Palestinian” by taking into consideration multidimensional factors situated at the crossroads of varied contexts and temporalities. 

    For more information see the Facebook event here.

To make sure to never miss out of any of our events (or changes to the program) you can subscribe to our program in any calendar supporting the iCal format. Simply do so by copying the following address and paste it into your calendar using the option subscribe to calendar: bit.ly/1pytLsC

You can also find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/CMESLund/ where you can like our page and receive updates on our events.